Skip to main content

About your Search

20110801
20110831
STATION
CSPAN2 88
LANGUAGE
English 88
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the national year of astronomy. the genesis of the book was steve's other book he has done for you and desert photography and astronomy and they have been asking him for years to write a more popular book on astronomy and we decided to do it together. the goal was to inspire people to go to these places. because of the inspiration, steve was at the planetarium as a youngster which you read about in the introduction to the book. mine was the apollo missions to the moon. we want to emphasize you can spark these kids' imaginations early in their lives could lead to a career and an avocation. an interesting career and exciting thing to do. it is a pleasure to go to work every day which not everybody can say. here's a rough map of the eight places we talk about from texas to southern california. we didn't cover mount wilson and los angeles. we cut it off in san diego and some other great places in california. like big bear. we chose to pick these out because they're a natural bunch and something we could imagine you could visit in a matter of about a week if you wanted to do it right and drive to
and a sheer joy in his work. in our world that man is steve jobs. steve jobs dropped out of college. he's an orphan. the guy just came out of nowhere just like howard roark. think what he accomplished. simply because he loves it. he's obsessed with this stuff. this toy is fun to play with. i can't assume to paint a. when he founded apple computer he completely transform the computer industry from a command-and-control mainframe model to individual empowerment desktop model. he made that happen. a few years later he bought an obscure little digital rendering company on fire so when george lucas did to get rid of it called pixar. he had this idea that this could be used to great full-length animated movies. he thought that would be pretty cool. he would like to see a movie like that actually found this guy named john lasseter and to work together on a move that would eventually be called boy story. is that somebody is years on and so much of steve jobs money, he came here to personal bankruptcy fun epic they almost discontinued toys door at the last day. he did a military path and did dea
in the united states. steve also was the coleader last year with former secretary of defense, bill perry with an assessment of the 2010th quadrennial defense review that seems like 100 years ago already in time so we time so we knew it fiscal issues the deficit debate was far different than in the aftermath of the n-november of a drug revolution when the tea party came to town and everything else happened has been subsequently what would like to do this morning is to begin by myself posing some questions to each of the panelists to frame the discussion and then of course go to you because we are fortunate enough to have television coverage today. when we go to the crowd, please identify yourself, wait for a microphone and ask a short question cannot be specific about who you are addressing it to if you would. i want to begin with alice because i think for a number of reasons that brought perspective on what this recent to accomplish is worth to understand before you get into specifics about its implications might eat maybe what they should be or should not be for the broader national sec
at booktv. steve early examines the current organizing strategies and structures of many labor unions in the united states. he also reports on internal conflicts of 2008-2010 that according to the author hurt union reputations and angered supporters. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> i want to thank everybody for coming out here tonight. i want to thank the bus boys teen. and it is great teen. in which tonight includes christine taylor from booktv and c-span. i want to thank her for doing the video were. it's going to make the proceedings a little more formal than when we're at the 14th and did an open number with a microphone floating around and many of question period. going to talk about 50 men so they get something, and then we will have to do the questions union convention style. you'll have to line up at the mic back and you're not going to get a chance to speak unless you see the green light go on. i have my figure -- finger on that control. but i hope that when we get to the question period, it will be lively. i know it will be. this to labor series that busboys and poe
debt for being such a good friend. to charles, to steve, you know, i worked at the "washington post," at cnn, i worked at npr. i worked at the hill. these guys are the best, and i am truly grateful to have you as my colleagues, so thank you, very much, and i wanted to -- [applause] also i wanted to say thank you to ed rogers, to shannon green and sheldon green who are here tonight and the hill who is here tonight. you know, steve's touched on this briefly, but there was a moment back then when i thought my career was over, and i thought that, you know, a career that took years to build in washington was going down the tubes fast, and today, many people thought, hey, we're going to a book signing, but, you know, you're here for a celebration. i don't know if they have celebrations at the end of the survivor tv shows, -- [laughter] but this is what it feels like to me. it's like i have my head back above the waves, and i'm standing. you can't get to that point without people who care about you, people who love you, and people who take you aside and tell you when you are wrong and how
an hour. [applause] >> thank you. much, steve. i am a great love for this wonderful institution at the national constitution center. i also want to remind you we have an exhibit upstairs and prosperity hall between diners hall and the main exhibit area on link and then i hope you're okay to take a look at some time in the coming weeks. it is obligatory for persons again in this chair to praise the author and to praise his book. unethically, i think anyone who agrees to perform my role as intraocular hefty genuinely believe that on the other occasions in which i done that, i've done this. but this really is an occasion in which i want to go a little bit over the top because they do think adam is a very special is your hand and this is a very, very national book. as he described adam's career, he really has been at a remarkably early age, a very important public intellectual, speaking to a wide audience about a wide variety of subjects, i think since he graduated from harvard not that long ago. and now, he is undertaken -- it's hard to believe -- by the way, either really ratty co
. i want to tell you about just one: steve finnerty from bedford. i talked to steve earlier today. he's a civil engineer and worked for the f.a.a. for the last 15 years. he's the sole breadwinner for his family of five. he has a young daughter and a pair of year-old twins who are struggling with medical issues. he's already lost nearly two weeks of pay, and he's not sure that he's going to get that pay back even when he does go back to work. he's concerned understandably about how he's going to pay his mortgage and his doctor bills and the grocery bills and all the other needs that his family has. and now he's facing the possibility of an entire month without pay. and there are thousands of people all across the country who are stuck in the same circumstance who want to get back to work, who we need to get back to work. we need them to get back to work so they can pay their mortgages and their children's college tuitions and their medical bills. we need them to get back to work so they can continue to build a g.p.s.-based air traffic control system like every other industrialized have
. we appreciate it. we're always in your debt for being such a good friend to charles and steve i have worked at "the washington post" in npr and on the helper growth and i am truly grateful to have you as my colleague. thank you very much. [applause] i also want to say thank you to ed rogers, shannon and show then and hugo gordon on the hill. touching on this briefly, there was a moment when i thought my career was over. year with a good career that took many years to build was going down the tubes fast. now people thought you were going to a book signing but you are here for a celebration. i don't know if they have that on the survivor tv show with this is what it feels like. [laughter] i have my head above the waves and i am standing. you cannot get to that point* without people who care about your love you for people who tell you who -- how you are wrong. so many tonight are zealous people especially those who are a professional journalist how things go up and down. you never know. tonight, and this is a celebration for me in for love. [applause] you were the best new stood by me.
, it was a struggle. let me start by apologizing to the panelists and especially to steve. unfortunately, i know exactly how to make sure that this event gets zero coverage. and the way to do it is to emphasize this is a very positive story about a $7 billion program that enrolls 900,000 preschoolers, and in washington, good stories just don't sell. so this is a great story. it's a story of scholarly research that showed that head start should be able to produce bigger and more lasting impact on development children than it was typically doing. it's a story of a committee of professionals called somewhat strangely, the committee on redesignation of the head start, that was appointed by republican administration and requirements passed by a democratically controlled congress, and they produce a report offering clear and compelling recommendations about how to improve head start. it's a story of a democratic administration that decided to touch the third rail of american preschool programs, and develop a creative regulation to implement and actually improve the committee's recommendations for refo
call the magical mystery tour, the best ceo's which were the sort of steve jobs and all the greatest. so they came back from the tour and they said you know, you are right. we like having a ceo and we know just the person who can be the ceo. steve jobs. [laughter] >> he was a little busy and i don't know if he was going to do that, but john finally got them to look at eric and there's a number of reasons they respect him. he had technical jobs and had a program that they liked and iraq was also smart enough to know he couldn't go in and say i am of the adelstein going to run this thing, step aside and let me make the decisions. instead, he adopted preconscious it seemed to me stance at every point, and i heard this a lot, talking about how early and larry and sergey work. he would talk about how much he learned from larry and sergey and eric what do these things that google that helped to make it an effective corporation, but he yielded some of his autonomy. there was this troika system where on some important matters they voted and you could say that in certain respects larry and se
before antietam there was a peninsula campaign. steve, heir brained or brilliant plan that had a chance at ending the war? is. >> well, mc"closing bell" rand thought it was going to be very much -- he thought the war would be over. his famous letter to lincoln after the failure of the seven days, he had actually drafted before the seven days started, and he was planning to resume the role of commander in chief -- general in chief, i should say. and he expected to be writing this letter from richmond. so he was very optimistic million the seven days, until lee attacked him. >> jim, lee emerged during this campaign almost overnight, it seemed. granny lee became the successful defender of the confederacy. was he a sleeping giant that was allowed to slumber too long by jefferson davis? >> well, no, i don't think so because lee's experience in the first year of the war had been a succession of failure. after he had helped immobilize the virginia troops and then had joined the confederacy when virginia finally did join the confederacy, he had been sent out to deal with the problem in the west
with absolute other integrity in his individualism and a sheer joy in his work. in our world, that man is steve jobs. steve jobs dropped out of college. he was an orphan. a guy that just came out of nowhere. think what he accomplished simply because he loves it. he is obsessed with this stuff. these are toys for him to play with, a campus rim to pay not. when he founded apple computer he completely transformed the computer industry from a command to control mainframe model to an individual empowerment desktop waddle. he made that happen. a few years later, he bought an obscure little digital rendering company on fire sale when george lucas needed to get rid of it, called pixar. he had this idea that this could be used to create full-length animated movies. he thought that would be pretty cool. he would like to see a movie like that so he found this guy named john lasseter and they worked on a movie that would eventually be called toy story. he spent so many years on it and so much a steve jobs's when he came near to personal bankruptcy funding it and they also almost and discontinued boy story.
work. in our world, that man is steve jobs. steve jobs dropped out of college. he was an orphan. a guy that just came out of nowhere. think what he accomplished simply because he loves it. he is obsessed with this stuff. these are toys for him to play with, a campus rim to pay not. when he founded apple computer he completely transformed the computer industry from a command to control mainframe model to an individual empowerment desktop waddle. he made that happen. a few years later, he bought an obscure little digital rendering company on fire sale when george lucas needed to get rid of it, called pixar. he had this idea that this could be used to create full-length animated movies. he thought that would be pretty cool. he would like to see a movie like that so he found this guy named john lasseter and they worked on a movie that would eventually be called toy story. he spent so many years on it and so much a steve jobs's when he came near to personal bankruptcy funding it and they also almost and discontinued boy story. toy stories in the top 10 dig is grossing movies of all time. ha
on our democrat's line in here is deep. eco gomic ahead, steve.ju you get the last word thisicm er evening. >> caller: thanke you.er i am surprised that i agree with florida.can from texas do -- but if this debt is hanging over the nation, why are increase taxes not on the table? why this reactionary feeling toward taxes? i just don't understand. i mean if you look at the taxes versuswi the growth, the nationt growth over the past 30 years and you look at a graph, and if you can find some correlation either positive or negative between the marginalin tax rate and growth, annual growth in the economy, we should be working il hollywood as you have that much of an imagination. >> host: thanks for all the calls and we dr. k appreciate tr reminder to "washington journal" tomorrow morning at 7:00 eastern nd they are there every day for your phonecalls and comments. the house is done. they finish their legislative work wrapping up this evening with speeches however david drucker of roll call right about the unfinishedbl business in the house.issued this a would be the faa authorization b
's go, we've got to that the commercial. my commercial is always in my view. all right, steve, lightning round, juan williams. >> unlike charles i will be fairly short. in that sense of the a lot like the panel. i also want to take just a second to congratulate juan for this book. it's an tremendous a competent. everyone knows the story behind what is happening here that unfolds in this narrative, and truly an exceptional story. and again, just underscore, having spent time, i think what about a three-hour dinner up in new york city as it was unfolding. it's i think easy for us and think of it as a story. but at the time it was a truly difficult thing for juan to go through. and do the job he does so well, i think
and discussion. at that point everyone on the panel will engage the questions. the last speaker is steve schier, he has wrote on the presidency and various presidents, and he asked to be last assuring -- see, he's laughing already -- assuring me in eight to ten minutes, he could wrap it all up and provide a satisfying conclusion to what we've done. okay. give us some satisfaction. >> oh my. oh my. [laughter] >> well, i've been sandbagged. i'd like to thank you for having me to arkansas. i flew through snowstorm in minneapolis to get here. now i'm besieged by thunderstorms. i hope it's back to minnesota, and because they have been very helpful to me in the last couple of days. one of my book projects involves figures out how the american political system was dysfunctional. they have given me both loads of evidence. and i'm -- alex just this morning sprung one on me with ideological war machines. i can work than. what an image. right, sunshine in her comments athought was very helpful in describing the relationship between microtargetting and governance. something i hadn't fully developed in my m
by sentries and there were no leaks. some think of julian assange as a character from a steve larsen thriller, heyman who could be either a hero or villain in one of those swedish stories that makes hacker counterculture with high-level conspiracy and sex. he has become one of the most famous people in the world. there are four movies in production about julian assange. he is a fast-moving target. he moves through the country when he can. he is eccentric, volatile, an expert computer hacker turned anti secrecy crusaders. bill keller of the new york times said julian assange runs, quote, a secretive cadre of and try it secrecy vigilantes'. he is currently in england fighting extradition to sweden where he is wanted for investigation on charges of sexual assault. his two accusers say he had sex with them at first consentual the but again without using a condom as he promised. he was sent to jail. he was arrested in the u.k. and put in the same victorian prison where oscar wilde served his time. an english court has ordered him extradited to sweden. he is now free on dale and his hearing is set
wages. the republican party builds itself as the white man party. linkdin is debating steve been douglas in the senatorial campaign. the republican party's slogan was vanquished with consolidates catholicism and slavery going hand in hand. i should tell you full disclosure abraham lincoln hated religious bigotry but follow the republican party line because it was very effective among the base. we heard in politics that the base with protestant working men in the small towns in farms and in the midway at -- midwest this resonated to the constituency so it was named under that slogan. >> now we're joined by the director of marketing for dk publishing. please start by telling us what the k publishing is. >> and illustrated reference publisher with offices all over the world and in the u.s. office we handle the distribution -- . >> it looks like you published a lot of the smithsonian bookspan macquarie do program a wonderful partnership in are happy to work with them and have some fantastic books. >> let's start with civil war. >> this is already been doing quite well. it came out this sprin
to that decision to downgrade the u.s. rating. steve, a democrat in florida. steve, you're on the air, go ahead. steve? >> caller: hello, i'm there. >> host: all right. we're listening. >> caller: all right. i have two questions. number one, ms.roth, you're referring to a lot of cutbacks on federal regulations on business, on corporations. >> guest: yes. >> caller: what if we were to cut the corporate income tax rate down to 14% because much of the larger corporations don't pay more than 14% anyway, and as a counterbalance, repeal the law that enables the corporations to take their operations overseas. i heard that the reason why they do this is to prevent double taxations. you know, if a corporation is not providing jobs for americans, why would that be our problem, and the other thing i wanted to ask is when the market was going down yesterday, i was listening to a show that was saying that a lot of people are taking their money out of stocks and purchasing u.s. treasuries because that was the, i guess, at least equals. wouldn't that be a good thing? i'll go offline to listen to your comments
] >> host: you mentioned the french revolution, i want to read this e-mail that came many from steve of the hollywood conservative forum. he writes about "demonic": >> guest: i am so happy to hear that. thank you, mr. steve whatever his name -- i agree. i love those chapters. and what was interesting when i was writing about the friend of rev -- french revolution was that i have a lot of smart friends, certainly better educated -- i went to public schools -- and so many of them who can tell me detail about, you know, every king of england and russian czars and be what colonial america was like knew almost nothing about the french revolution. and i, therefore, concluded they're hiding it from us. it's a very important contrast, the french revolution, and the american revolution. in fact, i wanted to start with the french revolution chapters and, consistent coincidentally,y hollywood producer friends told me, no, he'd read some of the chapters for him. i can't thank him. i'm the only person who has to check with people so i don't ruin their careers. he said, no, you've got to start wit
at the aspen institute. and this session is entitled what's next for the internet, and, um, steve jobs once said if you want to predict the future, the best way to predict the future is to invent it. and these three gentlemen have all had something to do with the creation of the internet and post-internet. our illustrious ceo, walter izaakson, back when he was editor at "time" in 1994 released pathfinder which is still out there today. ev williams, co-founders and co-creators of blogger and twitter, both of those inveptions will be -- inventions we'll be feeling the repercussions of that for another generation at least. so without further ado, walter izaakson, biz stone and -- >> okay, can you put your name tags back on so i can remember that? >> doesn't matter. >> doesn't matter? okay. by the way, we are actually going to start with a piece of news about the future of the internet and, seriously, a significant piece of news. these are the co-founders of twitter, and they have something to announce today. biz, you want to start? >> sure. we, evan and i and our longtime collaborator jason go
. and charles, steve, you know, i've worked at the "washington post," i forgot cnn. i've worked at npr. i've worked at the hill. these guys are the best. i am truly grateful to have you as my colleague. so thank you very much. [applause] >> and i want to also say thank you to ed rogers, shannon green and sheldon greene, who are here tonight. you know, steve just touched on this briefly, but there was a moment back then when i thought my career was over, and i thought that, you know, a career that had taken many careers on 10 years to go to washington, and today many people thought we're going to a book signing but, you know, you're really here for a celebration but i don't know if it celebrations in those survivor tv shows, but this is what it feels like to me. hey, i, head back above the waves, i'm standing. and you can't get to that point without people who care about you, people who love you, and people who take aside and tell you when you're wrong and how to do with the situation and give you kathleen hicks only people entering tonight are my friends, especially those of you who are p
brands. i just don't think -- i think there's one person, steve jobs, who is a unique blend of chromosomes, who can get unique touch with a person like martha, to get in touch. we hear 3d movies aren't doing well. four out of five households make less than $55,000 a year in this country. if you don't think that's an interesting way to live, try doing it for some of you that don't. they can't afford 3d. hollywood is starting to flounder. it would be interesting to bring it back if sony teamed up with google to really improve their user experience, or teamed up with disney, or teamed up with a content company that knows how to entertain. and use navigation. because i can't find half of the things that i hear about. i'm in the business. i think those are the two trends that we're going to start to see. better user experience and actually going out and teaching people how to do it. >> great. something about -- we all touched on this a little bit. i do work in the video space. it might be self-serving. the whole concept of how we are consuming. i'm a consumer of media, news, jour
again but investing is steve and i talked about it and looking to about two years away but we definitely explore that option. >> almost everybody that rights into the investigative asks that question when is the next book coming out and they haven't read this one yet. how do you turn it around [inaudible] >> the best way to get to baltimore or baltimore city is part of maryland and that would be the big part of changing, making devotee deal with the consequences of what we created in baltimore and then if you did that and affect people's lives significantly and the power to change things i think you would see substantial change. rather than creating the system of isolation make everybody accountable. i'm sure that will never happen in our lifetime but i think once the interest of the community with a small part of the community you will see substantial changes as long as we can isolate people and right crazy stories about her six murders and create this virtual wall it won't change. but once people are accountable, and for granted maryland pays a lot of taxes to as a kohl supports baltim
on prosecuting cases. um, doug schmidt and steve scherr who beat tommy norman in this trial liked tommy norman. i wasn't particularly friendly toward tommy norman. i didn't describe his style, but if you could imagine -- remember stanley tucci sort of slithering through the devil wore prada? that was kind of tommy's -- tommy would never say "said" if he could say "aver." he was a pretend white house kind of guy with a widow's peak. schmidt and scherr felt so badly for him that they seriously discussed offering him a partnership in their firm. [laughter] they liked, they liked tommy norman. a lot of people around the halls of justice liked tommy norman and were sorry to see that it had all, that he had messed up big time. it sort of wiped out all the accomplishments of the rest of his life. and he's no longer among us. so may he rest in peace. >> we'd like to remind our listening audience that this is a program with the commonwealth club of california, and we're listening to "double play: how dan white got away with murder and changed san francisco" with reporter and author mike weiss. unfortunate
up to the microphone. >> how you doing? >> good. >> steve, two quickies, maybe one for you, mike, and maybe one you both can answer. i'm assuming maybe the whole festival might have been filmed and they trimmed it down to make the movie. if that was the case, because i bought the cd of the hendrix set, anyway that could will be found and put into a movie to see the hendrix set? and the second question, i heard the dead show gig there was a nightmare for them, they played horrible, and there was water on the stage and all that kind of stuff. i thought maybe you could comment on those two things. >> there was water on the stage, that's true. this new boxed set released of dvd of the film has a lot of unreleased footage. >> yeah, i think 18. there's 18 performances never before seen that are -- >> and it's very well done. eddie kramer went in and remixed everything; so that's pretty amazing. the dead did have a horrible time on stage. they had a great time off stage. [laughter] this had a lot to do with why they had a horrible time on stage. also, their sound man was a guy named sta
of your argument? >> thank you come steve and to all of you for being here and to the circle for having us. it's a treat to be here and otter to be part of this series. i start work on this book actually as a detour from a book i'd been working on for quite awhile on the history of democracy from the ancient world to the end of the 19th century. and i was an angel in the teaching at the university of cambridge giving lectures on american political fox, when i came back to the u.s. for a symposium after the election of barack obama coming in on that trip, i reread "dreams from my father," and "the audacity of hope," and out of the themes i felt from the seven lectures were developed from his book "the audacity to go," so i looked around to see what had been written about this book and i found that the answer was nothing and people were treating it as if it were another book by a political hack, laying out his campaign program. but instead it's written about a jury well-educated professor of constitutional law, reflecting on american history. so why undertook to the kind of intellectual biog
center in philadelphia for a little more philadelphur. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve. i'm a great lover of this wonderful institution, the national constitution center and i also wanted to remind you that we have an exhibit upstairs in posterity hauled between the signers hall and the main exhibit area on lincoln that i hope you will get to take a look at some time in the coming weeks. it is obligatory for a person sitting in this chair to praise the author and to praise his luck, and ethically i think anyone who agrees to perform my role as interlocutor has to genuinely believe that and the other occasions in which i have done this, i have done this. but this really is in a cage and in which i want to go a little little bit over the top because i do think adam is a very special historian and this is a very very special book. as steve described adam's career he really has been at a remarkably early age a very important public intellectual. speaking to a wide audience about a wide variety of subjects i think since he graduated from harvard, not that long ago. and now he h
center in philadelphia for little more than an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve. i'm a great lover of this wonderful institution, the national constitution center and i also wanted to remind you that we have an exhibit upstairs in posterity hauled between the signers hall and the main exhibit area on lincoln that i hope you will get to take a look at some time in the coming weeks. it is obligatory for a person sitting in this chair to praise the author and to praise his luck, and ethically i think anyone who agrees to perform my role as interlocutor has to genuinely believe that and the other occasions in which i have done this, i have done this. but this really is in a cage and in which i want to go a little little bit over the top because i do think adam is a very special historian and this is a very very special book. as steve described adam's career he really has been at a remarkably early age a very important public intellectual. speaking to a wide audience about a wide variety of subjects i think since he graduated from harvard, not that long ago. and now he h
. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve. i'm a great lover of this wonderful institution, the national constitution center and i also wanted to remind you that we have an exhibit upstairs in posterity hauled between the signers hall and the main exhibit area on lincoln that i hope you will get to take a look at some time in the coming weeks. it is obligatory for a person sitting in this chair to praise the author and to praise his luck, and ethically i think anyone who agrees to perform my role as interlocutor has to genuinely believe that and the other occasions in which i have done this, i have done this. but this really is in a cage and in which i want to go a little little bit over the top because i do think adam is a very special historian and this is a very very special book. as steve described adam's career he really has been at a remarkably early age a very important public intellectual. speaking to a wide audience about a wide variety of subjects i think since he graduated from harvard, not that long ago. and now he has undertaken -- it is hard to believe and by the way i have
, steve moore. he's part of the editorial board and author of books including "how barak obama is bankrupting the u.s. economy" and several co-authored with author, the end of prosperity, return to prosperity, how america can reign in economic superpower status. he is a strong advocate of the flat tax, social security privatization, free trade, considered one the premier supply site economists in the united states. now, after opening statements, each attorney will call two witnesses who will be subject to cross examination. then each side will make closing statements and after wards the jury rules on the case. if the defendants are found guilty, i'll impose the judgments. you will listen carefully to the opening statements, and the witnesses at the end of the hearing will be required to determine whether there is sufficient evidence beyond a reasonable doubt and that ms. lee and the union followers are responsible for public malfeeance. is that understood? mr. moore, you may begin your opening at the same statement. >> thank you, your honor. ladies and gentlemen of the jury tha
statement first with the prosecutorring attorney steve moore. mr. moore is 5 distinguished member of the "wall street journal" editorial board and author of many books including "how president obama is bankrupting the u.s. economy" and several co-authored with arthur, the end of prosperity, return to prosperity and how america can reign in superpower status. he is a strong advocate of the flat tax, social security privatization and free trade and considered one of the premier supply side economists in the united states. now, after opening statements, each attorney will call two witnesses who will be subject to cross examination. each side will make closing statements and afterwards the jury will rule on the case. if the defendants are found guilty, i'll impose the judgments. you'll listen carefully to the opening statements and the witnesses and at the end of the hearing you'll be required to determine whether there is sufficient evidence beyond a reasonable doubt and that ms. lee and her followers are responsible for malfeasance. is that understood, jury? mr. moo, you may -- mr.
. >> i am steve adler of reuters. we have 3,000 journalists around the world and we invest in investigative journalism but that is not my question. >> i have never heard of you. [laughter] >> my question is this. if we had four, 25-year-olds on the stage who were active in social media with this conversation sound different? some of what is going on involves a change in the way information is shared and disseminated and thought about in the world today and establishment view points around how to do this responsibly is not in the air right now. i wonder if you would comment on the generational cultural changes affecting how we should be thinking of this. >> this hooks up nicely -- i am doing my best here. it links up nicely with jeff's point about even president obama who has been an avatar of transparency relating to that, once he has the mantle of commander-in-chief on he has to play his role and tighten up in ways you can understand. he has a big burden to protect us and that is why he resolve things in a different way which is good. why there needs to be other people in
me about the rejections and god bless steve rob and brown. he noticed the original title for slander was liberals unhinged. it was on amazon even though the book had not been seen by my editor yet. it only existed on my computer. steve ross noticed your book is selling on amazon. but no one would publish it. he published ever since. >> host: when did you start writing? >> guest: probably in kindergarten. very upset about the marshall tax rate. >> host: seriously? >> guest: i am joking. >> host: did you start writing for a school newspaper? i was never on that path though i always like writing. even when i was a lawyer i would run -- i would take weekends off and write for the human life review or a law review. i was arbuckle editor at michigan. i always liked to research and writing better than anything else i was doing. i don't think i was a founding editor but the cornell review conservative newspaper. a lot of conservative newspapers were started by people working for the main campus newspaper and could get something published and started their own newspaper. not us. we heard just
>> host: steve, "afterwards" made an interesting decision choosing me. they know we are going to disagree. >> guest: if an author can't defend what he's written to his most likely and certainly most knockable critic, then he shouldn't write the book. >> host: great. first i'd like to just talk about your own professional history. you are a lawyer, a journalist -- >> guest: not a lawyer. i never took the bar. >> host: sorry. entrepreneur and you have -- i know many years ago you wrote book about the teamsters. most recent book was about the aftermath of 9/11. >> guest: correct. >> host: now you have written about education reform. i thought this could be the next chapter of "waiting for superman." the book that accompanies the movie. you featured the same heros. joel klein and jonathan scher, and like the movie, teachers union is the biggest obstacle to reform. i should say. >> guest: do i get to comment on that, the cherry picked summary that you've done. which reminds me of how you cherry pick a lot of your data >> host: come on now, i'm the interviewer. >> guest: i don't thi
those are the ones like steve jobs to encourages innovation but the army and marine corps are quite too innovative. i don't know how, but the culture does value that. it starts at the top. whoever creates the atmosphere that allows people to step outside their role. if it is the wrong person at the top nobody raises their hand to do anything. >> [inaudible] talk about has the moral values of that nature. and unfortunately although we may be card carrying values for us to define what honor is. but in knowing what it is to save something for ourselves but across pollinating is helpful so to speak but the coach from ohio state, but two. [laughter] [inaudible] but we need to have those conversations among ourselves and even though we may come from different places but have the atheist agnostics and religion perspective, i am not squared away with bad guy up above the pact calls from other soldiers when the rubber hits the road and you are ready to the, one mco who is an atheist he has the army values to follow. >> could you elaborate with your steadies of values and "the warrior ethos." i a
is go steve after words an interesting decision in inviting you because of course we normally disagree but thought it would be interesting. >> guest: if another can defend what he has written to his most likely and certainly most knowledgeable critic, then he should not write the book. >> host: first i would like to just talk about your own professional history. you are a lawyer, journalist. and not to buy newer and you have a nominee or goes over you wrote a book about the teamsters about the aftermath of 9/11. now you have written a book about education reform. i read the book and i thought this could well be the next chapter of "waiting for superman," the book that the company -- you featured the same heroes. so i should say that being a historian -- >> guest: do i get to comment on the cherry-pick summer you have done? which reminds me you have cherry-picked a lot of your data. >> host: come on now. >> guest: i don't think that is a fair description of the book. i'd venture that several of the teacher unions leaders who are pertaining the book such as for example the woman
. the level playing field, no. the playing field with steve and people didn't talk so much then about a level playing field. but hamilton did see this as necessary to national security, national cohesion, to union and in the end he in washington did everything they could come including right down hired on american citizens come in a telephone have committed crimes by any stretch of the imagination in order to ensure that kind of unity. not a level playing field. >> was this the first of a series of taxes that he tried to levy on other industries? >> he did end up having to go the other taxes because it became impossible to collect. but he did choose the whiskey business for you series the reasons. i've said this wasn't me a misunderstanding. he just didn't get but the effect is going to be victims of a good nice place to collect tax firm. this particular tax is carefully calibrated. the whiskey business to drive small rebellious westerners on the business and get that piece of the business consolidated. he did work on other projects that were not tax related. he started, probably many of you
schmidt and steve who built the lead could beat him in the trial like tommy norman. i wasn't particularly friendly towards tommy norman. i didn't describe his style but if you can imagine remember stanley, the sort of slithering through fidel for prada? that was kind of tommy's -- she never would say said if he could say aver. he was a very pretentious kind of guy with a widow's peak. he went on working. schmidt and shur felt so badly for him that they seriously discussed offering him a partnership in their firm. [laughter] um, committee like tommy norman. a lot of people are of justice like tommy norman and they were sorry to see that it had all -- that he had messed up big time. is sort of white towel of the accomplishments of the rest of his life. i mean, he's no longer among us. so may he rest in peace. >> we'd like to remind our listening audience this is a program with the commonwealth club of california and we are listening to "double play" house dan white got away with murder and changed san francisco with reporter and author mike weiss. unfortunately we have reached the point in
where his client was george vanderbilt and do some work there and steve off to louisville which was close to asheville and do work on their park system. he was desperate traveling around taking a late-night rail ride and trying to secure his reputation and make sure he left a big lasting legacy figuring if he did enough parks maybe someone would last. >> and writing letters all the time. we have all forgotten these short e-mails at who knows, they will all vanish off of the face of the earth. he wrote thousands of these letters. >> the way i always describe it is it was the nineteenth century, olmstead was very much a sort of man about town. a lot of friends. the best way to describe it is effective of crossed the street he had diarrhea bout it and wrote a variety of letters about it because he was a journalist and several friends either had diary entries or letters that wrote about olmstead crossing the street. created this kind of so many different takes -- to have so many things in his life to the accounting for them and very insightfully and often in very long -- 10 or 15 pa
to 80% of your budget. steve got to get out of that business so it's not economic. the price the people are used to getting the newspapers you have to go on line. maybe you don't have a daily newspaper, in its bitter three days a week. maybe one day a week and an online business and then your costs are way down because you are no longer delivering these things every day, and sometimes they aren't even looking at it. so if you to take it and you also have to go on the business side of it and quit selling said coats and abs and start selling people. how do you want to reach we got the data. how're you going to get them there? how do you reach your audience, that's what we have to become, newspapers have to become modern formation companies. the help people that our business and where ever get their message across to the people in the audience. we do know the audience and we have to figure that out. i don't know if that is the answer but it's a helluva lot better than sitting here and watching everything go to hell in a handbasket. >> my last question is about methodology and writing the b
the hotels and resorts and all the military bases, you know, there's a writer i really like named steve erickson who once wrote that the two great contribution of the american civilization our annihilation and fun. [laughter] he was writing that about las vegas in a piece about, you know, all the old nuclear tests that were done in the nevada desert, but i think that metric applies to hawaii as well. but then on the other hand, it is still so much to often a sovereign independent country it once was. the language, even english speakers, people who take it don't speak hawaiian, words are peppered into normal talk if you're going to ask directions from someone, they would tell you to go malka r. mckay, not the towards the mounds or mckay towards the ocean. and it is such a singular place. and it still has so many vestiges of its singular culture that it is kind of lost in a way. that's why -- like i have a friend who he's a teacher and i was speaking to him and some of his colleagues, and is talking about something and it's butchering his name, and the pronunciation, and i made, i just ha
are always in your debt for being such a good friend and to charles and steve, i've worked at "the washington post," if worked at cnn, if i've worked at npr, i've worked at the hilt. these guys are the best and i am truly grateful to have you as my colleague so thank you. i wanted to also say thank you to ed rogers, to shannon and sheldon who are here tonight and to hugo gordon from the hill who is here tonight. you know, steve touched on this briefly. there was a momentum back then when i thought that my career was over and a career that had taken many years to build going on fast, and today many people felt a we are going to a book signing but you are really here for a celebration. i don't know if the of celebrations at the end of those survivors tv shows that this is what it feels like to me. i got my head back above, standing and you can't get to that point without people who care about you, people who love you and people who take usia and told you when you are wrong and how to deal with the situation. and so many of you in the room tonight are those people for me, my friends and especial
officers. two questions for steve. the core of your presentation is comparing effect sizes from impact study of head start with several other types of studies. i'm interested in whether those studies are capturing information on disadvantaged kids that are similar in their background characteristics to the kids in head start. a week comparing apples to apples? second question would be what is your point of view on the reform strategy that the administration is following? would you recommend anything different other than your call for more effective practice? >> thank you. we are comparing apples to apples. to the extent there are differents and the population they're biased against studies that serve broader population because effect are bigger than more disadvantaged kids are. lets only look at the kids who could get in to head start. the differences are bigger if you do that. i applaud what the administration is doing but it is a classic management problem here. there is a natural reaction in any administration of any program when there is bad news to increase regulation. i think hea
, and to charles and steve, you know, i've been -- i've worked of the "washington post," cnn, a fort at npr, i've worked at the hill, these guys are the best and i am grateful to have you as my colleagues so thank you very much. and i wanted to also say thank you to ed rogers and to sheldon come here tonight, and hugo gordon who is here tonight. steve just touched on this briefly, but there was a moment back then when i thought that my career was over, and i thought, you know, a career that had taken many years to build is going down the tubes fast, and today many people felt we are going to a book signing which you are really here for a celebration. i don't know if the had a celebration at the end of those survivors tv shows the this is what it feels like to me like i got my head back above the waves. i'm standing. and you can't get to that point without people who care about you, people who love you and to key was idf tell you when you're wrong and how to deal with the situation and get some council. so many of you in the room tonight are those people for me, i'm high friends and those of yo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)